There’s a divide in the gaming community and it cuts deeper than it should. No, we’re not talking about the Mario vs. Sonic battles of the 90s, Ken vs. Ryu, or the Counter-Strike: Global Offensive/Call of Duty debate. No, we mean the assumed chasm between video games and online games. Ever since the latter went digital in the early noughties, it’s become a force to be reckoned with. As an entity on its own, online gaming is worth more than $50 billion. In fact, by 2024, it’s expected to be worth close to $95 billion.


Gaming Industry, Growth, Female Gamers, New York
 

That’s some serious growth for an industry that was nothing more than a handful of rudimentary sites in the late nineties. When anything goes from nothing to something in a short space of time, it rocks the boat and catches people’s attention. In turn, that can create divides. Now, we’re not saying that video games and online games are mortal enemies. In fact, quite the opposite is true. The rise of virtual blackjack et al has actually enhanced video gaming.


Video Games Have Gambled on Something New

As well as adding more revenue to the collective pot (i.e. the gaming industry), developers have been inspired by the online sector. The Grand Theft Auto was a thing of legend for a long time before it finally opened in 2019.

All of these are examples of how the popularity of online games has inspired video game developers. Of course, synergy works both ways. Scan the online gaming world and there are numerous examples of video games adding extra depth to classics.


Mobile Casino, Games


Open-Door Policy Has Made Online Gaming Great

By licensing content and collaborating with so-called “rivals,” developers and operators have come up with some neat innovations in recent years. For the serious players, concepts such as Megaways technology have been used to turn simple online into complex affairs with more payout potential. On a general level, licensing deals with record labels and production companies have led to the development of music and movie like Guns N’ Roses and Batman. This willingness to span multiple genres and work with competitors has allowed companies to create something for everyone.

That’s a lesson video game providers can learn from. We’re not saying collaborations and crossovers don’t happen. They do. However, it’s not on the same level as online software developers do it. In reality, there is still a divide between the two mediums but the gap is closing. What would be cool to see is a further reduction in the gulf between video and online games. we’re not suggesting a complete merging of the two.

However, there are clearly benefits for both sides when it comes to crossovers and collaborations. Indeed, with mobile technology and social media making gaming more accessible to casual audiences, painting with broad strokes is necessary. This is where cooperation could really pay off. By working together, video game and online game developers could appeal to the masses more and make “gaming” a much bigger and better entity.

 

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General Information

Platform(s): Xbox 360, PS3, PC
Publisher(s): Capcom
Developer(s): Capcom
Genres: Third-Person Shooter
Themes: Survival Horror
Release Date: 2012-10-02

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